Do we need Klaatu to wake up humans?


Michael Rennie as Klaatu in the classic 1951 Science-fiction movie

Michael Rennie as Klaatu in the classic 1951 “The Day the Earth Stood Still”

Dialog from the movie “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (the original):

Secretary Haley: “Now that you understand the situation more clearly, perhaps you’d like to discuss it with the President.”

Klaatu: “I will not speak with any one nation or group of nations. I don’t intend to add my contribution to your childish jealousies and suspicions.”

Secretary Haley: “Our problems are very complex Klaatu. You mustn’t judge us too harshly.”

Klaatu: “I can judge only by what I see.”

Secretary Haley: “Your impatience is quite understandable.”

Klaatu: “I’m impatient with stupidity. My people have learned to live without it.”

Secretary Haley: “I’m afraid my people haven’t.”

This 1951 classic directed by the legendary director Robert Wise is one of my favorite movies of all times (forget the more recent version with Keanu Reeves which was horrible). This movie is not great because of its old special effects or just the wonderful actors, it’s because of its message: Evolve or die! and the numerous sub-messages in the movie which set it largely apart from others of its time.

Why this movie’s message matters to me.

In our world today, we are dominated by forces who dictate to us who we need to be without regards for any consideration of our true natures. These forces are hell bent on expanding their psychotic moral schizophrenia to as many of us as they can by keeping us docile with toxic and dead foods, drugs, brainwashing entertainment which serve to keep us numbed (and dumbed) down and with the help of puppet politicians who are really serving a hidden elite of wealthy individuals who are addicted to power and greed.

We are dominated by a tiny percentage of oligarchs all over the world who pass whatever laws they want about our food, our production systems, GMOs, repressive police, their war addictions, etc.

Each day, we wake up to information overload. We are monitored from the moment we are awake through our televisions, smart phones and now we might even have to worry about Amazon using drones to ship our book purchases (which would destroy competition for even more small businesses – are there any left?).

So what’s next? Pills to make us like whatever corporations want us to buy? They already own us as consumers just through advertising alone (turn off the damn TV!). They also are in fact trying to patent our DNA which I guess would give them total control over our bodies even though some people try to oppose it. They force our kids to get vaccinated and they brainwash them into getting addicted to animal flesh and secretions.

As the website Energy Grid said very well on their home page:

“Despite living in “the free world”, there are very few free men and women walking around in our democracies. Very few indeed. This is because some men and women have a human failing that drives them to want to manipulate others for the sake of power. That manipulation has enslaved humanity throughout most of its history, and still presents the most ominous threat to democracy.”

 

So, what are we left with?

Here comes the Vegan revolution (which I could rename the Klaatu revolution just for the purpose of this article). This is the only revolution which can potentially free us. Do we need some external extra-terrestrial force to make humans evolve to avoid obliteration, as the movie clearly demonstrates? Or can, you ask, Veganism be a solution to all this maze of control over our freedom to think?

Until we have the courage to recognize cruelty for what it is – whether its victim is human or animal – we cannot expect things to be much better in this world… We cannot have peace among men whose hearts delight in killing any living creatures.
~ Rachel Carson (1907-1964)

As Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! once said: “We need a media that covers grassroots movements, that seeks to understand and explain the complex forces that shape our society, a media that empowers people with information to make sound decisions on the most vital issues of the day: war and peace, life and death. Instead, the media system in the United States, increasingly concentrated in the hands of fewer and fewer multinational corporations, spews a relentless stream of base “reality” shows (which depict anything but reality), hollow excuses for local news that highlight car accidents and convenience store robberies larded with ads, and the obsessive coverage of traffic, sports, and extreme weather (never linked to another two words: climate change). Perhaps most harmful of all, we get the same small circle of pundits who know so little about so much, explaining the world to us and getting it so wrong.”

Amy is right (too bad she doesn’t cover Vegans however) and indeed Veganism, as well as other social movements, has grown because of people-powered media who have been able to get around the mainstream corporate propaganda and its destructive agenda. That growing awareness is fueling a growing activism around food justice, animal rights, environmental issues and other social issues. Let’s not forget that, despite being crushed, the Occupy Movement was able to survive several months through independent grassroots activism and public powered media. Others, like the Black Lives Matter movement, are creating change. And the LGBT movement just won the right to marriage equality. These movements are all fueled by people armed with only cell phones, social media and determination. The vegan/animal rights movement has proven that it can do the same but not until we stop fighting with each other over ridiculous things. Our biggest enemies are not the animal abusers, it is us when we are divided.

Issues around food are being discussed all over the world by more and more people and choosing a plant-based diet or go full-fledged vegan is the biggest tool of power we have against those who seek to control us. And the reason is that we become AWARE and INFORMED about, not just animal rights, but every other social issues and stop relying on what is being taught or told to us. We connect all the dots and get out of the imposed veil of ignorance on our minds, or as Will Tuttle calls it, the “herding mentality”.

We will never have real democracies through just the tool of voting at the booth (and I’m not saying we shouldn’t vote, I’m not Russell Brand! and I love Bernie Sanders for many reasons, most notably his record of integrity, oh well I had to say it!) but voting for someone, even an honest man or woman, is just the tip of the iceberg and doesn’t create any real change unless people keep being active after the votes and push for change as a mass movement. It is too easy to think that “well, we voted, that’s all I need to do.” We saw the result of that thinking last time. The roots of change come from people changing themselves, not trying to change a failing system which is self-destructive anyway. The powers that be will then be forced to follow after they try to repress us to stay in power. They won’t let go easily (and without causing pain) unless we are a massive force for peace and real change. It starts with, as always, ourselves. The fact that people seem to be turning to Bernie is a symptom of a real possible inner change for the end of inequalities and new values (at least I hope so). And even if Bernie doesn’t get elected, the desire for social change might be under way with or without him. He is just a symbol of it.

Dr. Vandana Shiva would say that saving seeds insures freedom for small farmers from the monsters of Monsanto and she is right. Since we have no control over the powers who control our food systems and try to control our lives (with mass surveillance, now also passed in France after the drama of Charlie Hebdo, the NSA and so on), we need to connect with each other even more than before and build our own communities, our own food gardens, our own sustainable lives and educate others to do the same by teaching them the WHYs of Veganism in a holistic way. Even in France, we talk a lot about veganic agriculture as the solution and we have regular environmental weeks which include a large emphasis on Veganism.

Until most people learn why Veganism is such a powerful tool of inner and outer change, nothing will really change. They can’t win against the police state with weapons. As many before them demonstrated (King, Gandhi, Chavez and many others), violence has never been the answer. But we can be non-violent and still resist while promoting change and give tools to others to become more independent themselves. Imagine what is possible.

As my friend Butterflies Katz once said about the Gentle World community: “Since then, the experience of living with Gentle World has transformed me into someone who is much different from the person I would have been had we not joined paths. My personal transformation has taken me from being a suburban, consumerist, superficial person – to a country girl, a naturalist who tries to live at one with her environment, and a non-consumer, a recycler and conservationist.”

In today’s economy, this is nothing short than a huge challenge (and dream) for a lot of us. I know that I depend on my own government financially at the moment. I am awfully aware of it. But I’m also aware that I need to seek solutions to this corporate/government slavery which, on the one hand allows me not to be on the street but on the other hand gives me very few ways for being independent.

I had friends recently who suggested that we take over some old abandoned villages in France. I thought this was a brilliant idea. Let’s create vegan communities in these beautiful locations, left behind by people who needed work and abandoned them. I bet there are a lot of such small towns in the USA and other countries too which could serve to create vegan communities, independent (at least for the most part) of corporate control and relying on each other for services by using the creativity and the know-how of each of us. Is this an utopist idea? Maybe it seems like it now. But I do believe this is what we will have to do in order to survive the disastrous policies of our corporate owned governments (in wherever country you are).

It has never been more important than NOW for vegans to educate non-vegans, social activists and anyone not yet part of our movement to all the issues of respect for life, environmental, animal ethics, sustainability and how we can achieve it with communities.

We truly need to be the change we want to see in the world. Because no-one is going to do it for us. We are the Klaatus that we’ve been waiting for; the ones who will make the change inevitable.

TDTESS3copy

Sources:

– Trailer of the classic (must see) movie “The Day the Earth Stood Still”

– Robert Wise about the movie on the AFI website

– Manipulation of the People — The Rudiments of Propaganda
John Smith—09/2003 (updated 09/05)

– 1,000,000 people against forced vaccination – Page on Facebook

– Mandatory vaccination bill for public schools passes California legislature – The Guardian

– The European Union forces GMOs on France – L’Europe autorise les OGM : la France n’a pas la possibilité de s’y opposer

– Interesting book to check out: Trade Is War – The west’s war against the world

– Amazon ships books with drones – Money magazine

– Law on mass surveillance in France: Mediapart.fr

– The 10 Biggest Revelations from Edward Snowden’s Leaks – Mashable.com

– Our DNA being patented – The Guardian

– Finding Community as a New Vegan – One Green Planet

– Vegan and vegan-friendly communities: Libaware

– Life in a Vegan Community by Butterflies Katz – Gentle World

– Black Lives Matter movement’s website.

Village des Possibles (or literally village of what is possible) in Montpellier (France). This video is subtitled in English. The village reunited various associations for the environment, economic justice, “Do it Yourself” workshops and vegan food!

– Will Tuttle’s article “Beyond Herderism” on the IDA website.

DaytheEarthStoodStill

Photos and poster of the movie found on Photobucket.com

© Copyright July 2015 – Vegan Empowerment/Veronique Perrot – All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or publication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

Posted in animal rights, Environment, Food, Health, Human Rights, Politics, Science-Fiction, Self-Improvement, Veganism | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Ghosts in Our Machine: A transformational experience (Review long overdue!)


With Jo-Anne McArthur at

With Jo-Anne McArthur at the “We Animals” exhibit at The National Museum of Animals and Society

In my almost 9 years as a Vegan, I have read many books and watched many movies and documentaries which had something to do with Veganism, being on a plant-based diet or just animal rights in general.

Some movies present you with tons of health facts on the benefits of eating a plant based diet. Others, like the wonderful The Peaceable Kingdom take you through the transformational journey of humans making the connection with other animals and do it extraordinary well.

The Ghosts in Our Machine is a documentary which takes you inside the mind of other animals and let you see through their eyes what they experience. Ghosts follows the animal photographer Jo-Anne McArthur whose work is recognized as beautiful, transformational and eye opening. The director of the movie, Liz Marshall, has directed the movie Water On the Table before which put the question of water as a human right and is therefore no stranger to difficult and controversial subjects.

What is truly remarkable about The Ghosts in Our Machine however is how Liz’s camera was able to become Jo-Anne’s eyes and see through her animals for who they really are and therefore document their conditions, sometimes horrific, sometimes happy, with a fresh look.

One poignant moment of the movie is when the camera follows Jo-Anne into fur farms and Jo-Anne frantically photographs the animals in the cages and then states that she can’t rescue them because they will just be replaced by others. Her job is to document and show the reality. But you can tell by the sadness in her reaction that she wished she could.

Another beautiful moment is her discussion with the editor of a big newspaper in which she explains to him that she is vegan and the horrors of the dairy industry and with shyness says “I want to save the world”. That is what I would call pure Jo-Anne, modesty and passion, all in one person.

I had the pleasure to meet Jo-Anne McArthur twice. First at the premiere of the film in Los Angeles with the “ambassador” of the movie, Captain Paul Watson for whom Jo-Anne had done photography (for Sea Shepherd) and then at the National Museum of Animals and Society in Los Angeles who gave her an exhibit (thank you Carolyn Mullin!) in which she surprised me by actually remembering me. (You mean me? the little Frenchie?). She was a total joy, simple, modest and a real human being. These are rare people in our world today.

Coming back to the movie, anyone not involved in the animal rights movement will not be able to come out of it without a new vision of who animals are: sentient, beautiful, intelligent, emotional, unique. The beauty of the images, whether I talk about Liz Marshall’s movie photography or Jo-Anne’s own photography, is what really makes this movie so powerful. Nothing is more blunt and true than the reality that is depicted.

For those who are afraid of seeing only tough things about animals, there are obviously a few difficult moments to watch. This is however also compensated by beautiful and moving moments in which we see Jo-Anne at Farm Sanctuary enjoying the company of rescued animals and this simplicity of that moment is what makes us realize how beautiful each individual animal is. They cease to be numbers, they become persons.

I’ve seen a lot of documentaries about Veganism, animal rights, health and so on in the last few years, but this is definitely one of the best.

The best thing I’ve learned from Jo-Anne is not to be afraid of documenting what I see. After she told me “it doesn’t matter if you don’t believe you’re good”, I picked up my camera again and, yes, for good.

Note: Liz Marshall became vegan as a result of making this movie.

With Captain Paul Watson at Sage after the premiere of the movie.

With Captain Paul Watson at Sage after the premiere of the movie. Director Liz Marshall is in pink behind us.

Poster banner of The Ghosts in our Machine

Poster banner of The Ghosts in our Machine

Photos:

– Top: with Jo-Anne at the National Museum of Animals and Society for “We Animals” exhibit.

– Below: With Captain Paul Watson at Sage in Culver City after the premiere.

– Publicity banner of the movie.

Sources:

– Jo-Anne, in the movie, worked on a remarkable book which is a must have. It’s called We Animals.

– Information about The Peaceable Kingdom (another wonderful movie) can be found on the Tribe of Heart Website and the trailer.

– Pictures of the Los Angeles premiere of the movie on Facebook.

– Pictures from the “We Animals” exhibit at the National Museum of Animals and Society.

Facebook page of the movie and official website.

US DVD and International DVD or Itune versions.

– Jo-Anne’s personal website.

Captain Paul Watson about Jo-Anne McArthur.

Trailer for the movie

© Copyright July 2015 – Vegan Empowerment/Veronique Perrot – All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or publication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

A Message to my Vegan/Animal Rights Sisters (and brothers)


oppression-458621_1280 I have to ask you: when did we become just pleasure dolls for men and forgot that our history, or should I say our HERstory is rich in great, intelligent and peace loving women who have been put to the side of humanity’s knowledge by the patriarchal rulers?

It first starts in our childhood. We are given Barbie Dolls, we dress them up, they wear makeup, and we make sure they get married to Ken because that is all that a young girl should apparently expect, make sure Barbie gets as much stuff in her home, because we are brainwashed to be consumers of useless crap and if Barbie was “born” today, she would probably get breast implants, facelifts, and surgery to make her buttocks bigger.

As the artist Daena Title said: “In my “DROWN the DOLLS” series, the formal compositions of refraction and reflection mirror the way women see themselves reflected and distorted, for better or worse (I believe for worse) in the image of the Barbie doll. Pervasive societal standard, indoctrinating tool, or “just a doll,” this 51 (and counting) year old icon presents a view of women that is as relentlessly fake as it is unattainable.”

The other way to know why it is so is to look at who controls the medias: 80 to 95% percent of all medias are controlled by mostly white men. Our columnists are still overwhelmingly old white men. There are four times as many male columnists as female columnists at the three biggest newspapers and four newspaper syndicates. (The Washington Post has 25 men to 7 women, and The New York Times has 10 men to 2 women.) The median columnist age is 60, while the median age for the American population is only 37.” ~ Time

And it’s not just the media; it’s also the movie industry. Even actress Kristen Stewart recently called Hollywood sexist.

And of course men know women better than women themselves: “In media coverage of women’s issues such as abortion, birth control, and Planned Parenthood, men are doing most of the talking, a new study has found. Men are quoted around five times more than women in these stories, according to the research group The 4th Estate […] Among 35 major national publications, including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, men had 81 percent of the quotes in stories about abortion, the research group said Thursday, while women had 12 percent and organizations had 7 percent. “ ~ The Daily Beast

And some people say that “male (mostly white) privilege” doesn’t exist? As Barry Deutsch points out in his Male Privilege checklist “Pointing out that men are privileged in no way denies that bad things happen to men. Being privileged does not mean men are given everything in life for free; being privileged does not mean that men do not work hard, do not suffer. In many cases – from a boy being bullied in school, to soldiers selecting male civilians to be executed, to male workers dying of exposure to unsafe chemicals – the sexist society that maintains male privilege also immeasurably harms boys and men. However, although I don’t deny that men suffer, this post is focused on advantages men experience.”

Do you also remember this great Howard Beal moment from the movie Network in 1976?

“We’re in a lot of trouble! Because you people and 62 million other Americans are listening to me right now. Because less than 3% of you people read books. Because less than 15% of you read newspapers. Because the only truth you know is what you get over this tube. Right now, there is a whole and entire generation that never knew anything that didn’t come out of this tube! This tube is the Gospel. The ultimate revelation. This tube can make or break presidents, popes, prime ministers. This tube is the most awesome goddamn force in the whole godless world and woe is us if it ever falls into the hands of the wrong people!”

“And when the largest company in the world controls the most awesome, goddamn propaganda force in the whole godless world who knows what shit will be peddled for truth on this network! So you listen to me. Listen to me! Television is not the truth. Television’s a goddamned amusement park! Television is a circus, a carnival, a traveling troupe of acrobats, storytellers, dancers, singers, jugglers, sideshow freaks, lion tamers and football players. We’re in the boredom-killing business.”

“But you people sit there, day after day, night after night, all ages, colors, creeds. We’re all you know. You’re beginning to believe the illusions we’re spinning here. You’re beginning to think that the tube is reality and that your own lives are unreal. You do whatever the tube tells you! You dress like the tube, you eat like the tube, you raise your children like the tube, you even think like the tube. This is mass madness, you maniacs! In God’s name, you people are the real thing! We are the illusion!”

What kind of women and messages are allowed on TV? People like Kim Kardashian, represent the worst of womanhood by using their bodies as a sexual tool and sending the message to other women (of course with the happy assent of men) that it is all that women are worth.

Is this what we have become? Sexualized constantly beyond any sense where we don’t even have any role models anymore for young women to emulate who represent the beauty, intelligence and ideals of most women? Is it any wonder that the rap culture calls women “ho“, “sluts”, etc…? while young girls put on tiny skirts and dreams of having big breasts, big behinds and looking like Britney Spears, Kim and others like them?

One of my biggest wake up call, besides the World Peace Diet by Dr. Will Tuttle and The Sexual Politics of Meat by Carol J. Adams, on the state of how women are perceived and manipulated in our culture, is the documentary Miss Representation which interviews leading women (of all stripes and political views) about their struggle to be recognized as intelligent leaders and having to work twice as hard as men to achieve it.

During the last election campaign, any time Hillary Clinton (whatever you think of her) was appearing on television, the media was only interested in her looks, the fact that she liked wearing pants and so on. And they did similar non-sense to then Senator Barrack Obama with blunt racist remarks. When does it stop? How many (white) men you see criticized for their clothes or looks on TV? The media is made of ultra-sexists corporate owned old white males. And they hate change in society. So they control what we hear, see and think.

I found a wonderful blog by an unknown woman (she doesn’t identify herself in it) who said: “Although men who commit sexual assault are in the minority, their actions occur within the larger context of a culture that relentlessly commodifies the female body at every possible turn. From bikini contests to strip clubs to the use of supermodels to “sell” consumer goods, the message is clear: the female body exists for the sexual gratification of men. Thinking, breathing, feeling human beings are reduced, in our consumer culture, to a means to someone else’s ends. This hypersexualization of our bodies creates a tremendous amount of pressure on us to look and act sexy all the time, because we are told (implicitly and explicitly) that our primary measure of worth lies in our ability to please men.”

We can’t turn to the media without seeing this hypersexualisation/commodification of women’s bodies. There is nothing about their feelings, their intelligence, their inner beauty, and their aspirations. They are treated no differently than the cows whose bodies get abused and their babies stolen constantly. The fact that we see women getting implants for bigger breasts (because they now value themselves on the size of either their breasts or butt) mirrors what we do to cows. As Will Tuttle always says, “what we do to animals, we end up doing to humans”. But it could be also said that our treatment of animals mirrors how we value ourselves as human beings.

The women who get naked during PETA‘s actions are doing it “willingly” obviously but as the blogger above said, “And that’s exactly why it’s absurd to claim, as some do, that women can empower themselves by participating in their own commodification. Sure, the woman at the strip club ‘chose’ to work there. But that ‘choice’ was made in the context of a culture in which women do not have the economic resources that men have; in which she was taught, from a young age, that it is her job to please men; and in which the men who pay to watch her degrade herself have been taught, from a young age, that they are entitled to sexual privilege over women. Victim-approved exploitation is still exploitation.” It’s no more a freedom than claiming that we “choose” to eat meat, dairy and eggs. It’s exactly the same: a conditioned false “choice”. It’s a choice made before we were born by this male dominated world of might makes right.

Women like Eleanor Roosevelt who oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights have been relegated to the pages of history while the only examples of intelligent women (which we agree with or not) in our time are few and between and get ridiculed by the sexists of the world and constantly told to shut up. One example: Hillary Rodham Clinton took her husband’s last name because of social pressure to conform. As Rudy Moore of the New Yorker explains: “She did not do so much on the campaign trail that year. A woman was expected to smile, and not give speeches. And the name issue was in the forefront.”

Other important women include: Senator Elizabeth Warren, a strong advocate of the poor and working people, former Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, former Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Oprah Winfrey, Dr. Vandana Shiva, a champion of seed rights, anti-GMO and women’s rights activist, Gloria Steinem, who always fought for women’s rights and the most recent Nobel Prize Winner Malala Yousafzai, who fought for the right of girls to be educated. But what role models young girls and young women see constantly? None of them. Instead they get the “selfies” of Kim Kardashian, the rap videos of male singers with women drooling over them, the latest sex scandals, and why Oprah is suddently so fat. Yes, that’s what we give as role models to young girls in the male dominated media.

My current favorite peace activist woman at the moment is Leymah Gbowee (Nobel Peace Prize Winner) who started a sex strike to force men to act on the violence in her country of Liberia and managed to avoid a war. Nothing works better than threatening men with the one thing most of them care about: their sexual male privilege, or genitals’ use over women (hence the rates of rapes and subjugation against women in the world which are at an all time high).

In the vegan/animal rights movement, vegans are not immune to this male privilege and I found it to be pervasive in our movement. Yet the majority of these men (and women) don’t even see it. Our movement is 80% female. Yet the majority of animal protection organizations are controlled by men. PETA’s Ingrid Newkirk is one of the rare females who leads one but she buys into what I described above. I might as well ignore her on this.

Yet, in the history of the movement, it’s mostly women who have started the fight for other animals and that is conveniently forgotten for the most part. If it were not for my friend Carolyn Mullin’s National Museum of Animals and Society in Los Angeles, I would never have known about these pioneering women: Margaret Cavendish (Writer, anti-vivisectionist -1623–1673), Jean Clemens (Daughter of Mark Twain – she was the founder of several animal protection societies – although I coudn’t find a reference to which ones – 1880–1909), Frances Power Cobbe (Founder of the National Anti-Vivisection Society and the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection – 1822–1904), Rukmini Devi (Dancer, founder of the Animal Welfare Board of India – 1904–1986), Nina Douglas-Hamilton (Co-founder of the Animal Defence and Anti-Vivisection Society – 1878–1951), Lizzy Lind af Hageby (Founder of the Animal Defence and Anti-Vivisection Society, known for the Brown Dog affair – 1878–1963). Who even knows these pioneers? And there are many others. And some of them were also abolitionists who fought against African-American slavery.

The philosophers of the animal rights movement are plenty. But the ones always in the limelight (although justly) are mostly men: Gary Francione, Peter Singer, Will Tuttle, Tom Regan and a few others. Most of us have read any of their books, maybe all of them and they have accordingly influenced our thinking. Gary Francione and particularly Will Tuttle, talk about sexism or as Will refers to it “the suppression of Sophia” and recognize our feminine values of caring, compassion and inclusion should be at the forefront of this movement. Yet, despite all this, there are a number of men in this movement who still don’t see or recognize their male privilege in this society. That is the taboo they refuse to talk about.

And what about our women philosophers? Most of them are cast aside, or simply ignored. I bet there are some of them whose work you don’t even know. I’ll throw some names here: Carol J. Adams (Eco-feminist writer, author of The Sexual Politics of Meat (1990)), Brigitte Bardot (Former model, animal rights activist, founder of the Brigitte Bardot Foundation), Sue Coe (Artist, illustrator, author of “Cruel: Bearing Witness to Animal Exploitation” (2012)), Karen Davis (President of United Poultry Concerns, author of The Holocaust and the Henmaid’s Tale (2005)), Joan Dunayer (Author of Animal Equality (2001) and Speciesism (2004)), Maneka Gandhi (Politician, founder of People for Animals), Lee Hall (Lawyer, legal director of Friends of Animals), Marti Kheel (Ecofeminist writer, founder of Feminists for Animal Rights – 1948–2011), Colleen Patrick-Goudreau, Hope Bohanec, Judy Carman, Emily Gaarder (who wrote the book Women and the Animal Rights Movement), Corey Lee Wren (and her website the academic abolitionist vegan) and so many others.

As women (and men), we have to stop always accepting that only men can write about animal rights or vegan philosophy. And as much as I respect their work, some women deserve to be at the forefront as well. Shouldn’t we be represented by women as well since our movement is mostly female? I embrace the works of the men above but I wish more space was given to the recognition of all the women pioneers and those who fight in their corner of the world but get no credit. Men get the credit for the most part.

The vegan/animal rights movement is still based on the inequality of the current world where men still have all the privileges and power while women are relegated to just followers or even told to shut up. I had recent experiences with vegan men who basically told me that they knew better than me on certain issues. The message was clear: you’re a woman, so shut up. Well, no, that’s just it. I WON’T.

Women make the majority of people on this planet and we also live longer. Maybe it’s because we’ve had the endurance to bare all the bulk of violence from the wars and abuses of men over the centuries while they congratulate themselves on their achievements. The Nobel Peace Prize has only 47 women winners in its over a 100 year history. They give peace prizes to men who are war lovers: We know about President Obama but did you know that Hitler and Mussolini, themselves, almost got one? At the same time, women peace activists have been denied that honor for the most part.

In most war torn countries, the tactics of raping women (and children) are used to silence them. Even in the western world, most countries, even when they have equal pay for equal work laws for women, don’t enforce these laws. Yet, despite these statistics, there are still men in the animal rights/vegan movement who still deny that women have it bad in the world, believe there is no problem and turn the other way on the issue, the same way we currently don’t want to reconcile with the predominant racism as we’ve seen in the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Let’s not forget again that everything is connected. When you have millions of cows, hens and other female animals whose reproductive systems are being used and exploited forcefully, is it any wonder that we see it done to women too? It is not. Because we are not separate beings, we are all part of the same whole.

As long as some refuse to acknowledge that sexism (and even racism) exists in our movement and are unwilling to be part of a real, practical and just consciousness shift, nothing will ever really change. Animals will continue to be abused, women, men and children killed. Removing the blinders about the reality of the objectification of women and female animals is the next step to real justice in the world.

Personally, instead of women falling into the trap of being sexualized and used, I would love to see all of them start a sex strike around the world to force men to stop with their insanity. After all, we have control over that.

Sources: – Talk by the Nobel Peace Prize: Leymah Gbowee: Unlock the intelligence, passion, greatness of girls

– How Liberian Women Organized a Sex Strike and Helped End a War (with video of the Colbert Report) – The Institute for Inclusive Security

– The documentary Pray The Devil Back to Hell recounts the struggle of the women of Liberia and how they succeeded.

– The news program Democracy Now! from April 27, 2015 highlights the work of three Women Nobel Loreate.

– Actress Kristen Stewart on Hollywood’s sexism.

– 9 Depressing Facts From the Latest Women in Media Report – Time – Even more depressing, Men Rule Media Coverage of Women’s News – The Daily Beast

– Nobel Peace Prizes awarded to women – Nobelprize.org

– Amazing Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech: Malala Yousafzai

Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: Feminist Art Base: Daena Title – Brooklyn Museum

– Interesting article on Male Privilege: The Male Privilege Checklist by (yes a man!) Barry Deutsch – Alas a Blog

– Also see the report The Status of Women in the US Media 2014 and a report from The Global Movement: Who Controls the Media?

– Who are The top 25 influencial women in the world today? – the blog An Armenian Journalist’s Notes

– Dr. Vandana Shiva talks about how women do most of the farming in the world and Ecofeminism

– My article about PETA: Deconstructing PETA’s thinking.

– From Free from Harm, this excellent essay by Lee Hall: Why I care about Animals Rights.

– Great speech from Colleen Patrick-Goudreau: From Excuse-itarian to Vegan

– Article on Care2: 5 Reasons Why Women Make Great Leaders for the Animal Rights Movement

– From the Vegan Pensive blog: Striking at the Roots of Patriarchy.

– The must see documentary Miss Representation: An overlook at the Hegemonic society that utilizes the media as a tool to dictate gender expression. This sets into motion the subordination of women in our society and the value that they hold as individuals politically and socially.

Photo: Barbie crushed – Courtesy of Pixabay.com (Royalty free picture website)

© Copyright May 2015 – Vegan Empowerment/Veronique Perrot – All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or publication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

Posted in animal rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights | Tagged , , , | 16 Comments

NEVER JUDGE A COUNTRY BY ITS COVER


11070093_10152881088003138_6161414846062680155_n

For some time now, I have noticed a lot of comments on various Facebook groups about the fact that the French are so behind with Veganism and animal rights. The French are “un-evolved”, “they don’t get Veganism”, “they don’t give a damn about animals”, “shame on them” and on and on. Yes I’ve seen these comments. In many ways, it is true that Veganism, from an ethical point of view, is, compared to the United States, probably about 20 years behind in its growth.

So I’d like to come out of the French closet for once and set certain things straight (and I’m ready for the inevitable backlash). First of all, yes indeed Veganism is not as wide-spread in France but so is Factory Farming, junk food, McDonalds, GMOs, etc… Maybe I just want to ask my American friends to have a little bit of perspective and be maybe a little less critical of what the French are doing as much as I have, so far, not been too critical of the American system.

But frankly, there are things to say: First of all, until recently, we have resisted America’s imperialistic imposition of values on us by, for instance, resisting Factory Farming (thanks to our politicians who love to imitate the American example) and GMOs (both widely pushed forcefully on us by American trade deals with Europe and US corporations like McDonalds, Monsanto and others). But we still resist. Many years ago, the French farmer José Bové (famous here for being an anti-globalization activist) destroyed a McDonald “restaurant” with his tractor in protest of America’s imperialistic junk food cartel and he ended up going to the Seattle protest in 1999 as a hero of small farmers everywhere. And some people occasionally burn down GMO fields as well in protest.

Also, if things are so bad and we are so behind, as a lot of Americans say, how come you can count on your fingers the number of obese people you will see in a lifetime here and if you find any, they are usually American tourists? Unfortunately, this is also rising thanks to the invasion of American fast foods.

As a journalist for The Observer remarked,

[t]he Americanisation of our bodies once meant importing the concept of the gym, a religious ritual of bodybuilding and aerobics among machinery and wall-to-wall mirrors; […]Today, especially outside the metropolitan areas, the Americanisation of our bodies means obesity (Odone 27).

In the US, I saw more obese people in one day than in all my life in France (two so far!).

In Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser remarks that “on any given day in the United States about one-quarter of the adult population visits a fast food restaurant”. A critic for the New Yorker complained that “we’ve become an eat-on-the-run, absent-mindedly feeding, cup-holder culture” .

How come in France, we have (for the most part) GMO labeling and some GMOs are banned in most of Europe while America has become a scientific experiment for Monsanto since 1995 when the first GMO tomatos appeared on the market? How come, if we are so behind again, we eat less meat than Americans do per capita and we have not only always had farmers’ markets full of fruits and vegetables all over the country but also now more and more INDEPENDENT 100% organic stores popping up everywhere (with lots of vegan foods in them, not just whole foods). Compare this to the (still) handfull of farmers’ markets in America (particularly in segregated poor neighborhoods) and the fact that Whole Foods Supermarket or as I call it “The Wall-Mart of the natural food market” sells so-called high priced organic and non-organic “natural” foods which sometimes contain GMOs and pretty much bought up most of all the independent organic stores in the United States.

We also have a 100% vegan store, “Un Monde Végan”, in Paris, America has… well one (correct me if I’m wrong): “Viva La Vegan Grocery” (owned by friends of mine) and the rest is online (like here) and it’s a much bigger country (France is no bigger than California). We also have a good list of online vegan stores as well. And let’s not forget that we pioneered the Veggie Pride and the Paris Vegan Day (which is actually more than one day). Both started in France of all places! And we gave you the Statue of Liberty, so we can’t be that bad (ok, I’m being cynical even though it’s true).

Let me be clear. I have lived in America for 18 years and I loved it. But I also have the perspective to see what is wrong either here or there. I’m also politically aware. In an evolved country, you don’t have endless wars in the Middle-East (for oil – thanks George W. Bush and President Obama) which kill/displace millions of people (who end up seeking asylum in Europe – thanks a lot!). An evolved country doesn’t keep spreading factory farms and, as everything is connected, doesn’t have a mass incarceration system (the largest in the world with mostly non-violent drug offenders) for its most vulnerable citizens and a racist police which kills black people in front of someone’s phone with impunity (see the Eric Garner‘s case among many others). It also doesn’t have a medical system which dumps its poor people on Skid Row because they can’t pay their medical bills (see Sicko by Michael Moore or I could relate what I saw with my own eyes).

How come being poor is being criminalized in the US and people can get arrested for giving food to the homeless like this 90 year old American who go arrested several times, while here we have something called “The Restaurants du Coeur” (The Restaurants of the Heart) started by the French comedian Coluche which has served free meals to the poor for 30 years and by the way, we have activists from Food Not Bombs (a good US import this time) who also give free vegan meals to the homeless. People can grow their own food gardens while some Americans are not allowed to. We also don’t have a war on womens’ reproductive rights (as I’ve seen in the case of Purvi Patel recently), and a ridiculous love affair with guns and religious bigotry as well as politicians who believe that evolution is a myth and that God created the Earth 5,000 years ago (see the recent Republican nominees for the Presidential election).

So who’s to say what “evolved” means?

France may not have moved much about Veganism but we are not obese, we eat a lot less animals and yes we have a thriving animal rights movement and environmental movement. Sea Shepherd France is the 3rd biggest branch of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society in the world and Captain Paul Watson can tell you why. L214 has been praised for its efforts to raise awareness for its undercover footage of farmed animals and is now, just like in America, also facing bans and fines on undercover filming. Well if the Americans do it, our own agribusiness cartels are going to follow, right? The French Vegetarian Society (not yet called vegan because most people don’t understand the word yet here) promotes vegan dietary recommendations and all their recipes are vegan and they, in fact, want not only abolition but provide necessary nutritional information because a 100 % plant-based diet is still ridiculed over here. We also have a Vegan Society and an Abolitionist Vegan Society. My friends from FUDA (Forces Unies pour les Droits des Animaux – United Forces for Animal Rights) and I regularly have vegan challenges on the streets and we have a fantastic communication with people. So it’s not that the French are not interested in Veganism, what I found out is that they in fact are (I have never been so busy as a vegan lifestyle coach!) but that they lack information. So we’re growing more and more each year as we get less marginalized and get on TV.

NO COUNTRY is perfect. We have bullfighting and foix-gras (which we fight and try to abolish constantly legally and on the field), you have rodeos and more testing on animals in laboratories than we do. We have our corrupt politicians (who now also follow George W. Bush’ and Barrack Obama’s examples on Foreign policies), you have yours. You have Fox News and other corporate owned medias, we have our mainstream media which fortunately still allows real debates to happen on many issues and we do in fact have debates on our food habits (most notably about the environment which seems to be what touches people the most here). Try to find this on Fox News and other corporate owned outlets in America. Even Democracy Now!, which is supposed to be independent, is only now talking about Cowspiracy but, otherwise, never wants to bring up the subject of animal agriculture as the biggest contributor to climate change. This is not the case here. We in fact talk about it. And, for the record, Cowspiracy is also being showed more and more all over the country here. Therefore we’re not against “good” US examples.

America has one vegan school as far as I know (thanks to James Cameron), France has adopted vegan alternatives in many schools in the country. I recently managed to get the city of Montpellier to adopt vegan menus as alternatives in schools. Yes, it’s not 100% vegan but it’s a beginning.

So instead of continuing to compare notes between both countries, I’ll stop there. But this is a fact that there is a need for evolution all over the world. And that calling one country less evolved than another also requires the perspective and the chance to have experienced something other than one’s own country only. Europeans travel far more than Americans to other countries (but maybe it’s also because we have long paid vacations and unlimited sick days).

Veganism is something that is growing everywhere, at various speed. It is also growing in France because we are getting invaded by the industrial American model and the French hate it. I could criticize other countries for being even slower than France. It requires a major shift in consciousness for all. But to say that one country is less evolved based on just its apparent growth in Veganism (without knowing what is really going on) is also to ignore all the other problems like human rights violations and ecocide which are also all connected.

Vegans are one community and this doesn’t depend on where they’re from, it depends on their capacity to make, as Will Tuttle once said, some “rather obvious connections”.

Sources:

– Factory farming is on the rise in France, union says. France 24 (in English)

– Restrictions on Genetically Modified Organisms: Library of Congress

– France Stands Up to Monsanto, Bans Seed Giant’s GMO Corn – EcoWatch

– Who is José Bové? Wikipedia.org

– José Bové not welcome in Bush’s America: The Nation Magazine

– GMO Crop Sabotage on the Rise: French citizens destroy trial vineyard – Food Freedom blog

Reading American Fat in France : Obesity and Food Culture – European Journal of American Studies

French Food Companies Can Use ‘GMO Free’ Labels, Government Says – Bloomberg Business

– The Failure of the first GM foods – Ghorganics.com

– Meat consumption per capita – The Guardian

– The Markets of France: about Farmers’ Markets in France – About France

– Whole Foods caught in GMO marketing deception, false advertising – here’s the proof – Natural News

– Whole Foods: The False Face of Humane Farming – Investigators Find “Certified Humane” Cruelty to Chickens – United Poultry Concerns

– Is Whole Foods Wholesome? – Slate Magazine

– If you go to Paris, visit Un Monde Végan! and in Los Angeles, Viva La Vegan Grocery!

– Resources to visit France as vegans: Véganisme.fr

– Information on the Veggie Pride (started in Paris) and Paris Vegan Day.

– Why Mass Incarceration Defines Us As a Society – Smithsonian Institute

Sicko by Michael Moore (with spanish subtitles) on the US Health Care system as compared to other countries like France.

– How America turned poverty into a crime – Salon.com

– Police Arrest 90-Year-Old and Two Pastors for Feeding Homeless People – Nation of Change

– Goldman & Coluche – Les Restos Du Coeur – The song that launched the “Restaurants of the Heart”

– Who is Coluche? Wikipedia (English)

– Food Not Bombs in France. http://www.foodnotbombs.net/FRANCE.html

– Personal Gardening and Farming Are Becoming Illegal – The Guardian

– Proof of the GOP War on Women – Politicus USA

– 20 Years in Prison for Miscarrying? The Case of Purvi Patel & the Criminalization of Pregnancy – Democracy Now!

– A bit of humor: Bill Maher on Jesus Christ the Republican Candidate

– More humor: Real Time – Bill Maher Educates The Tea Party On The Founding Fathers.

– Even more humor: Bill Maher on France and Bill Maher – America Isn’t #1 and also Bill Maher : most Americans are Dumb and Uneducated

– Republican Candidates Don’t Believe in Evolution – Blissfullknowledge YouTube

– Captain Paul Watson in Montpellier (France). My own video on YouTube

– The Vegan Challenge from FUDA and a video to inspire activists. Also FUDA US video (subtitled in English by myself)

– Cowspiracy finally talked about on Democracy Now!

Photos: 1. Défi FUDA (Try vegan for 10 days) – 2. Anti-Bullfighting protest in Arles

© Copyright April 2015 – Vegan Empowerment/Veronique Perrot – All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or publication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

11141739_10152918917923138_4021153167140409863_o
Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments

The Zoophilia/Bestiality Underground


dog-454146_1280

I have always considered the sexual act as something between consenting people (of whatever gender) who are mature enough. Indeed, you would probably find shocking the idea of adults having sexual desires for children and sometimes acting on them. We consider pedophilia an act of absolute sickness. But it may come as a surprise to think that some animal advocate do not apply the same principles when it comes to other animals.

In the past few months, I have been deeply involved with an investigator in looking into the zoophilia/bestiality issue (to expose people who abuse other animals sexually) and I have been horrified at not only what is being done to other animals but to see where some so-called “animal lovers” actually go in the way they think of other animals. I have seen pictures of dogs being raped and people commenting things like “it’s cute!”. I have seen people (in our movement) being asked about just sexual desire for other animals and not having any problem with it.

Zoophilia is all over the web (if you know where to look) and you can find tons of “secret” groups on Facebook devoted to people who get a sexual kick at watching men (and women) having sex with other animals. My research (with the investigator) has allowed me to witness some rather gruesome and disgusting imagery and in some cases videos that these people proudly display while they get cheered on by others.

What I also found out is that some of them masquerade as animal rescuers in order to get an animal as sexual partner. So if you run a shelter, a sanctuary or simply want to find a home for a rescued animal, you may not even know that your animal is going to get sexually exploited.

From a legal perspective, laws vary by countries and states but there are exemptions like this one (quoted from Wikipedia):

Sexual handling of an animal for the purposes of veterinary practice, or animal husbandry (breeding), is normally exempted where such laws exist. In public discussion for the recently passed Oregon law, however, one animal shelter’s spokesperson wanted the husbandry exemption kept out, as he was concerned that someone might use these “accepted farming practices” as a legal loophole to then have (legal) sexual contact with an animal only for personal enjoyment. One of the legislators responded by asking if they were trying to outlaw an act (of sexual contact), or a state of mind. The veterinary and husbandry exemption was left out of Oregon’s law in the final, enacted version.

We know for a fact that some farm workers in factory farms do sexually abuse animals. It has been reported by undercover investigators over the years and by authors.

But maybe it is necessary to explain a little more what science and psychology have to say. The difference between zoophilia (the term comes from the Greek, which means “animal lover”) and bestiality are, according to Wikipedia:

Zoophilia and the law looks at the laws governing humans performing sex acts on animals. Laws against humans performing sex acts on animals, where they exist, are concerned with the actual act, which it commonly refers to as bestiality, rather than the sexual attraction to animals. For this reason, prohibitions of zoophilic pornography is more varied; they may be unlawful if an actual sex act with an animal is involved, but the status is not clear cut if there is a mere representation, such as a painting or cartoon. In that case, normal obscenity laws will normally apply. All zoophilic imagery is widely regarded as pornography.

Some people seem to think that zoophilia is not and shouldn’t be an offence or be considered as a psychological disorder. However, let’s assume Wikipedia above referred to this in the case of children and most people would be horrified. There is, as is often the case, a double standard between how we treat human versus non-human animals. Therefore accepting just zoophilia is to me speciesist because no human (I hope) would agree that a man with sexual desires for children is a healthy mentally balanced human being.

In both the case of children and other animals, one party is non-consenting. What is shocking is to see famous authors (and philosophers) in our movement in fact defending it, like Peter Singer:

But sex with animals does not always involve cruelty. Who has not been at a social occasion disrupted by the household dog gripping the legs of a visitor and vigorously rubbing its penis against them? The host usually discourages such activities, but in private not everyone objects to being used by her or his dog in this way, and occasionally mutually satisfying activities may develop. Soyka would presumably have thought this within the range of human sexual variety.

Mr. Singer forgets one thing. He would probably never say that about children. And yes the household dog sometimes grips the legs of visitors but there is a huge difference, the dogs can’t control their sexual urges, we can! And we have a moral obligation to do so because not doing so would violate an animal (as it would violate a child). And also, what does he know about a dog’s thinking anyway? We are supposedly moral animals who can choose what is acceptable or not. As vegans, we have an even better responsibility towards those at our mercy. Because a dog or a orangutan (he does quote the example of an orangutan making sexual advances to a woman) may not understand or see the difference between a human or one of his kind (even if we are closely related to apes). And, as I stated above, animals do not have the ability of controlling their sexual urges and are also probably (because of us) deprived of the necessary relief they would get with their own species in most cases. But then, not wanting to control sexual urges towards anyone is also what brings us damning statistics like the ones from the United Nations where we learn that at least one woman in three will get raped in her life. So maybe, humans (particularly men in this case) are not that good at controlling their libido!

In fact, psychology is clear about zoophilia:

[…] paraphilia wherein animals are recurrently favored or solely utilized to reach carnal arousal and satisfaction. The animal, that is generally a household pet or farm animal, is either utilized as the object of sex or is conditioned to lick or rub the human partner, called a zoophile. The most typically utilized animals are sheep and pigs, in rural settings.

As you can see in the definition above, the animals are “conditioned”, therefore manipulated. This is not about the free will of the animal himself, it is about the selfish needs of humans.

Peter Singer also seems to suggest that something done through history is therefore acceptable. Then the same could be said about eating the flesh of animals, wars, slavery, and rape.

To accept the behavior of zoophilia (and therefore potential bestiality) in our movement is equivalent to the Church hiding pedophilia in its ranks for many years because it is politically incorrect. Why do we think it is a horrific act towards children but not animals? I have to ponder at the degree of speciesism still in the thinking of some people.

Michael Kiok, the president of the only (fortunately) official worldwide federation of zoophiles believes he is being persecuted by the German government for finally banning bestiality because he can’t have sex with animals anymore. Should I feel sorry for this pervert who abuses other animals for his own self-gratification?

The French author Franz-Olivier Gisbert, in his book “L’Amour est éternel tant qu’il dure” (Love is Eternal as long as it lasts) makes also the apology of bestiality and zoophilia. As someone noted on the commentary section of his book (on Amazon.fr):

This object in paper that I don’t dare calling a book is a firework of junk of all kinds. The author inflicts the poor reader who didn’t ask for much an exhaustive catalog of his sexual obsessions without notice except in Chapter 41 (if you get there!) where the charitable Mr. FOG (Franz-Oliver Gisbert) advises weak minds to go directly to [chapter] 44 to avoid the scenes of bestiality, which he seems to be a refined connoisseur. We reasonably can advise to read such opus whose title is deliberately misleading. Any honesty would add a cover band indicating that it is a text reserved for “warned” adults.

Some people (as I’ve seen in the case of Germany) go as far as having brothels so they can act on their sexual desires for other animals, which means that animals are brought in and definitely are NOT consenting to this. Where is even consent in having a sexual desire for an animal? Does a child have consent over the sexual desire for him by an adult? I leave that to the reader to decide.

From a health perspective, sexuality with other animals is linked to penile cancer. So in effect, someone having sex with a (non-consenting being) is also putting himself at risk. And let’s note also that exposing a child to acts of bestiality is considered child abuse.

What does the scientific community think of it? In a big clinical psychological study done on zoophiles (translated in English) by Marion Nasswetter, we find this:

The tenth version of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, published by the World Health Organization (2008) and in short called ICD-10, categorizes the sexual human-animal contact under F65 –deviating sexual preference. If unusual sexual fantasies or sexual urges are focused on exceptional non-human objects, on children, on suffering or humiliation of the self or other persons, then the condition may present an adverse effect in several areas of the life of the affected. Additionally, it is pointed out that almost exclusively men are found to have these deviations. Besides fetishism, exhibitionism, pedophilia, and others, the sexual human-animal interactions is subcategorized under F65.8 – the other deviations of sexual preference.

There, activities like indecent phone calls, rubbing on people on crowds or public transport (frotteurism), or sexual acts on corpses (necrophilia) are also found. The sexual intercourse with animals is called sodomy in this source.

My personal conclusion:

I consider animals under my care as my children and friends, not potential sexual partners but they are, as psychologists suggested, conditioned, therefore not willing participants. What can two different species, although capable of affection towards another, communicate in terms of what one party wants or not? There is a huge difference between “petting”, caring and loving an animal in the case of protecting, sheltering him/her, feeding him/her and making sure he/she is healthy and imposing a sexual “preference” on him/her which he/she can’t agree verbally with. You might as well try to explain to a child why you want to have a sexual relationship with him. In both cases, you have no real consent or dialogue with the other being because that being doesn’t have the capacity (in terms of communication or maturity) to understand it and agree with it. Therefore, you’re dealing with someone who can’t consent at all unless, as mentioned above, manipulated into agreeing.

I find zoophilia and, in its worst form, bestiality, to be a psychological disease which I place on the same level as wanting or having sex with a (obviously non-consenting) child. Zoophilia, just like pedophilia, should be something that vegans should be aware of and outright reject.

And let’s not forget that, as Dr. Will Tuttle said many times, what we do to animals, we end up doing it to humans. It isn’t a coincidence that most cases of bestiality are committed by men just like in the case of rapes towards women.

 

Sources:

– If you want to sign a petition against bestiality in the USA: Forcechange.com

– Peter Singer’s article “Heavy Petting”.

– Article (in French) about Peter Kiok, the head of the World Official Zoophilia Federation.

– List of commentaries (in French) about Franz-Oliver Gisbert’s book

– Cases of zoophilia/bestiality: The Crime of Bestiality/Zoophilia: Sexual Assault of an Animal.

– Article from the Lectric Law Library on the criminality aspect.

Zoophilia and the law on Wikipedia.

– Article from Live Science: Sex With Animals Linked to Penile Cancer

Psychology Dictionary: What is ZOOPHILIA? definition of ZOOPHILIA (Psychology Dictionary)

– Marion Nasswetter’s study on people who are zoophiles: A clinical psychology online study into zoophilia

– Think Progress article: What We Can Learn From The Largest International Study On Rape That’s Been Conducted So Far

– UN women article: Fast facts: statistics on violence against women and girls

– Video from PETA on the sexual abuse of farm animals in factory farms.

– Huffington Post video about the Sexual Abuse Of Cows In Factory Farms Is ‘Not Uncommon’

– My essay of the Link Between Violence to Animals and Humans which explores more general violence.

– And of course, the best reference on the link between the abuse of women and animals for … anything is Carol J. Adams.

Photo: Man and dog, http://www.Pixabay.com (Free photo stock site)

© Copyright April 2015 – Vegan Empowerment/Veronique Perrot – All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or publication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

Posted in animal rights, Health, Women's Rights | Tagged , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Why giving up is not an option


Me and Chloe

I received a post from a fellow activist recently that this was going to be her last action with us and this really bothered me in the sense that she obviously expressed burn out but also despair in her comments.

In essence, she was saying that this was her last action because “I am tired of people who don’t care and don’t listen to us”. We’ve all been through that. And it’s important to recognize how this burn out affects all of us.

We are surrounded by a lot of dark forces in the world right now. Whether we talk about “religious” extremism, state sponsored terror, corporatism, government spying, social inequalities and of course the plight and horror of what our animal friends go through, there is a lot to despair about. Is it any wonder that so many justice activists (in any social movements) just drop out? As vegans, we also face ridicule, incomprehension, social pressure and so on. There is nothing easy about fighting for any just causes and pushing social progress in the mentality of the masses.

In fact, the pressure is even getting worse as we see a rise in extremist terror, corporate and government overreach and manipulation. For instance, we saw the terror attacks in Paris and Boko Haram which were both horrific and linked to fanaticism. We see the spying of our governments on our privacy and their use of police brutality (whether we talk about innocent African Americans in the US, Environmental activists being killed in France or in South America or whether I get tear gassed by the police for standing up against bullfighters). We see also a war on women with damning statistics showing that “globally 35% of women have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence” (UN Statistics), forced into marriage as children or go through sexual mutilations.

All of this, as Dr. Will Tuttle would say, has its roots in our routine violence towards other animals and the constant suppression of feminine values of caring, compassion, nurturing of the Earth, the animals and each other. Extremism stems from a challenge to patriarchal rules wrapped in “religious” bigotry. Government spying results from a challenge from justice activists of all sides to question the status quo. And corporate domination result from people wanting governments actually representing them, paying them decent wages and corporations being greedy, pillaging entities who only care about the bottom line and the hell with our future on this planet.

The fact that it is getting worse is to me a good sign that big changes are under way in the background. This may sound like crazy thinking but read on.

Let’s get back to social justice for animals. Why are corporations so determined on buying up politicians to enact laws to prevent filming in factory farms? Because we are a threat to their bottom line. I don’t believe laws can be changed unless they come from grassroots efforts to put pressure on the puppets who want to control us. But when powerful elites feel threatened, just like kings, they will try to turn us more and more into serfs until, like in the French or American Revolution, we have finally enough and more and more of us rise up against them.

For the past few months, I have been doing Vegan education on the streets of Montpellier (France) and before that in Los Angeles, California. What I find fascinating in France is this thirst to learn more and this bigger openness to animal rights and veganism which is completely contrary to what I had expected since I considered Los Angeles as a “headquarter” of Veganism and Animal Rights thanks to the large number of activists and Vegan restaurants (compared to here). But the truth is that French people are generally less brainwashed and better educated (sorry Americans, it’s not to put you down as the good people that you are) and therefore more critical of their government and what they are told in general. The difference is really striking. The reason we have so little Vegan education in France is that Vegans and Vegetarians are extremely marginalized and that no government agencies recognizes plant-based eating as a healthy diet (America has the American Dietetic Association’s position on plant-based diets). And we also have (sic) our sacro-saint French cuisine recognized as “world heritage” which re-affirms the beliefs of people that a plant-based diet is not healthy.

Just this Saturday (Jan 31st), I held my first AVF (French Vegetarian Association) stand, which despite its name, strongly promotes Veganism and Veganic agriculture. I became a delegate for my region a few months ago because it is one of the few non-profits who directly promotes Vegan nutritional information to the public. I met so many people who thanked me for doing this, telling me that they were either vegetarian, already vegan, or trying to get there but didn’t know how (as there is not much education done in this country, except through the AVF and a few debates on TV) that I gave more business cards in one day than in months in the US. Of course, I also met the usual deniers but at least most of them took the time to try to understand and see our side of the story.

Now, let’s come back to the issue of women. Is it any surprising that there is an all time high of violence against women and suppression of their freedom around the world? No, it’s not. And it’s obviously because women are starting to come into their own power. We just have to look at the incredible example set by the most recent Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai who, even though she was almost silenced by patriarchal religious extremists, never gave up and keeps fighting for the right of girls to have education. What a powerful example! The violence against women and also the rise against their reproductive rights is similar to the way females are being exploited in animal husbandry. We are dealing with a 10,000 year old patriarchal mindset, also set in the religious institutions (if you really look at them, they are patriarchal) in which women, like other animals, are still seen as inferior by a lot of the world’s society.

The same way Vegan/Animal Rights activists are being repressed, women in general still can’t in many way achieve gender equality because of the rampant sexism, violence against them, work inequalities, religious bigotry, and so on… But the fact that both social justice movements scare the hell out of the ones who seek to control us, this violence on both sides is increasing.

I am reminded of these words from Ghandi: “When I despair, I remember that all through history the way of truth and love have always won. There have been tyrants and murderers, and for a time, they can seem invincible, but in the end, they always fall. Think of it–always.”

Because we are getting stronger and there are more of us each day, these evil forces who seek to silence us and oppress us and other animals will eventually collapse like the castle of cards that they are. They are not build out of bricks, just out of sand because they don’t stem from truth and that is not sustainable. I believe more and more people are becoming aware of the inner truth of our world and are rejecting the status quo. The reaction to the attack on cartoonists in Paris and seeing an historical 4 million people on the streets (including myself) was a powerful statement that you can’t silence an idea when its time has come (whether you agree with Charlie’s work or not).

Let’s not forget what history teaches us. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was declared enemy #1 and called the “most dangerous negro in the US” by the FBI. Cesar Chavez (himself a vegan) connected the dots between oppression of humans and other animals and was also threatened multiple times. Environmental activists, like our Rémi Fraisse here in France, are murdered by the police for defending the land and biodiversity while Peruvian environmentalists are being murdered for defending their ancestral lands. Vegans are put in jail as well as other animal liberators and human rights activists. Yes, it is a tough world when you are on the side of justice.

But in the end, justice always prevail. The civil rights act was passed, women got the right to vote (at least in western countries), young women and other women are starting to rise up in Arabic countries where they are horribly oppressed, men are getting more and more in touch with their inner sensibility, and let’s not forget: more and more people are connecting the dots and going vegan.

So this is what I responded to my friend quoted above:

“I understand where you’re coming from. But we can never be sure of the impact we can have on other people. I have been an activist for almost 10 years (in the USA and now in France) and there is progress. The problem is that it is difficult to quantify our impact on others statistically but we do have one! I give you several examples:

– In the USA, almost all the non-vegans who came to me directly (and not solely through the internet) have become vegans and are now activists for other animals themselves. 
– In France, recently, at an anti foix-gras event, a young woman came to me to ask help for going vegan because she wasn’t sure how to go about it and was disgusted by the violence towards animals.

The problem is not that we don’t make any difference, we do! It is that we are still a minority. If we persevere (and I saw big changes in the USA in only a few years), we bring over more and more people to our cause who themselves influence others around them. It’s that simple. 

If the suffragettes had given up because they were being ridiculed and were a minority, women would probably not have had the right to vote until much later. If blacks in the US had not persevered, racism would still be a legal institution. It doesn’t mean obviously that there is no longer any racism or sexism but that there are laws against some forms of discrimination. 

The animal struggle (even though Greek philosophers already had positions in favor of animals and vegetarianism) is still in its infancy. The end of racial segregation in the USA took over 200 years (although there is now economic segregation, if not legal). We are not the ones who will see the changes, we are the pioneers. Our job is to plant the seeds which will grow principally in the future.”

The way to combat burn out is simple: stop for a while. It doesn’t mean giving up completely. But we are not machines, we have responsibilities, pressure, we feel down whenever we see cruelty and as vegans, we are especially sensitive to the pain of others. That’s what sets us apart from the blinded masses. We also face family pressure, social pressure. There is a time when it’s best to take a break and renew ourselves. What good is a burn out activist when it comes to educating people? It’s a waste of time. I would rather have people with me who are energized, passionate (passion mellowed with a little bit of wisdom) and committed to the goal of animal liberation than people who are too down and incapable of talking to people. We are still sensitive beings too.

It’s important to balance all the cruelty we see by seeing the other side. Animal photographer Jo-Anne McArthur is an example of someone who constantly takes horrific pictures of animal cruelty (and suffers from PTSD because of it) but renews herself by going to Farm Sanctuary on a regular basis to take pictures of happy animals, free of exploitation. We have to strike a balance in order to have the strength to keep going. Animal sanctuaries are a fantastic way of reminding ourselves why we do what we do and seeing happy animals is totally uplifting. But not everyone has a sanctuary close by to go to. I like watching uplifting videos also reminding me why I am into this, like this one from FUDA  (A French Animal Rights group – United Forces for Animal Rights) called FUDA Together  (subtitled in English) or this wonderful one from Evolve! Campaigns called Why Vegan? Go back in nature for a while, do a retreat. The important thing is to come back stronger than ever, and a better advocate than ever.

But giving up completely is not an option because I know that we are slowly winning. And by the way, my friend is back in action.
Sources:

– The World Peace Diet by Dr. Will Tuttle

– The story of Malala Yousafzai

– UN Report on Violence against Women

– Article about 7 ridiculous restrictions against women around the world.

– Article from Arab News about the e-book Arab Women Rising.

– Facts and Figures from the UN about violence against women.

– Martin Luther King Jr.’s inspiring forgotten speech “Beyond Vietnam” on the military industrial complex, corporate and government power, war and why we need to keep on struggling for justice in a non-violent way on Breaking The Set.

– Jo-Anne McArthur’s extraordinary work can be seen in the movie The Ghosts in Our Machine. The movie can be bought in “instant watch” on Amazon.com and her book We Animals is a must read.

Photo: I am holding Chloe the Hen at the Gentle Barn Sanctuary in California (2013).

© Copyright February 2015 – Vegan Empowerment/Veronique Perrot – All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or publication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

Posted in animal rights, Health, Self-Improvement, Veganism, Women's Rights | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

#JeSuisCharlie: Why it should matter to justice activists


10917432_10205752541882485_619490169805145479_n

“I do not agree with what you have to say, but I’ll defend to the death your right to say it.” 

~ Voltaire

“I have never made but one prayer to God, a very short one: Oh Lord, make my enemies ridiculous. And God granted it.”

~ Voltaire

For the last few days and I believe for the next few weeks also, I am and will continue to grieve the events of Paris and the slaughtered people of Charlie Hebdo as well as the police officers, hostages, and the death of a poor dog caught in all this insanity. This is therefore a very difficult blog for me to write but one that I find necessary to explain certain things to the rest of the world.

Charlie has been a pillar of free speech for years before it was even called Charlie Hebdo (the name derives from the character Charlie Brown in Peanuts and is an inside joke about President Charles De Gaulle; Hebdo means weekly). Most people in France (who are old enough) remember its earlier version called Hara-Kiri. I read many people’s comments on Facebook, Twitter and the numerous articles in the world’s press. For days during the unfolding between the slaughter, the hostage situations and the manhunts, I was glued to my computer screen (and TV set) and witnessed the world’s reaction to all of this (and mourned/cried a lot). It mostly felt like a horror movie in which the ending is really bad for the heroes. I still carry a deep pain in my heart as of this writing. I particularly can’t look at pictures of Cabu without having tears.

Some said that Charlie “had gone too far”. What I find fascinating is that these comments mostly come from people outside the country who don’t understand something: French satire. So let me give you some historical context for this.

French satire is a tool to express anger, rage, revolt, humor and rejection of the status quo which has been around since the days of Queen Marie Antoinette and to ridicule and fight the then Royalist Feudal system which kept millions of French in dire poverty while a tiny elite of aristocrats were living in Versailles and other castles. They were the 1% of their time, while the rest of the country was its 99% (sounds familiar?). Satire is even older than that as you can find it in the most oppressive kingdoms in history where the only people who could ridicule their rulers were the “bouffons” or court jesters. They could be funny and obscene but they were allowed, weirdly enough, to have their say. No one else could.

Satire (particularly French satire) is based on a total rejection of any “ism”, whether it is the then “Royalisme” (from royalists) of the kings and queens, or the “ism” of religion, the “ism” of capitalism, the “ism” of all racism, but also ridiculing the ridicule. It can explain also why Charlie Hebdo is also the only newspaper in France (satirical or not) which takes strong positions on animal rights (as the cartoon in this blog shows). Yes they can be vulgar, obscene, provocative, even downright unpalatable at times. But they say their truths with their best weapons: their pencils and words. That is the essence of a free society (at least ours) that what you say can’t and should never be policed by violence, whether it’s the state, corporate manipulation or in this case, fanatics.

They were not the only ones. Before he died (or was murdered, depending on who you believe), the comedian Coluche (a legend here) was also very much like Charlie Hebdo: vulgar, outrageous, provocative. He even did a mock “gay wedding” with a fellow (gay) comedian at a time when you couldn’t even talk about gay rights, let alone gay weddings. He never said he was gay (he was married) but bluntly said on television 30 years ago that “he had tried it but in the end, that didn’t work out” (and got a big laugh). This shocked a lot of people 30 years ago but now he is a reference impossible to ignore in France’s political and social discourse. Coluche’s outrageous exterior was hiding a heart of gold and he founded “Les Restaurants du Coeur” (Restaurants of the Heart), which 30 years after his death, still feed poor people (of all races and creeds), help them with legal issues, provide services to re-insert them into society, etc… The best satirists and sometimes the most outrageous and provocative people (at least in France) have proven to be also the most generous to others. Cabu was vegetarian and was seen many times protesting animal cruelty. Charb, Wolinsky, Cabu, and Tignous and the other victims present at the newspaper meeting (ironically about racism) that day, as well as Luce Lapin (who was wounded but fortunately is alive) have always took positions for denouncing absurdity while making people laugh at it. But their position on animal rights is not even the point here.

France is a secular country. As such, we don’t follow anything but secular laws, not religious laws. In fact, you’re not supposed to even show your religious affiliations in Federal systems like Public Schools (Private & Religious schools are a different matter). Racism is an offense in our laws, mocking religion is not. Charlie is anti-racist and never mocked people based on their race. But they have the right to mock religion. So whether one religious community feels insulted or not, our right to free speech is protected by law. And for the record, nowhere in the Koran does it say that you can’t do a drawing or any representation of the Prophet. This is an idea that has been around since the 15th century only and has become culturally accepted by some Muslims but not all. Religions tend to change in time. There were a time when women had no soul for the Catholic Church. Animals still don’t according to them. I was raised Catholic but would never have criticized the right of Charlie to mock the Catholic religion (and they did).

When I moved to the United States, I was ready to follow its laws. There is a reason I never moved to various countries in the world, it’s because I didn’t agree with their laws because they had religion as their state laws. Separation of “Church and State” is a sacred right we won with the French Revolution. It is not debatable even if it may insult various groups.

A society where anyone can say anything is what allows vegans, environmental and human rights activists in general to be bold and daring at exposing uncomfortable truths to society.

When I was at the Montpellier Republican March (not to confuse the word “republican” as a party as a lot of Americans did, it means March for the Republique), I felt compelled to document visually this day by not just filming the other 100,000 plus people who were there with me but to hear their voices, their feelings. Muslims talked to me. Children talked to me. Even a French-Mexican woman talked to me (I had never met a Mexican living in France, only in Los Angeles). There were people who said that Charlie Hebdo went “too far”. But all of them, Muslims included, said that what these fanatics did had nothing to do with Islam and that, even though they disapproved of caricatures of the Prophet, they also approved of the right of others, in a free society, to ridicule him. It is interesting to know that, besides the threats that fanatics (using religion as an excuse) had made to Charlie, it’s mostly the Catholic Church who sued them most over the years. But that is meaningless, Catholics burned down theaters in France when the movie “The Temptation of Christ” was released. So fanatics can use any religion as an excuse and atheists (like the former Soviet Union’s stalinists, the Nazis, and so on) can use non-religious ideologies with the same zeal to kill as well (and they killed millions of people). And as all the Muslims I met told me, the Prophet would never had agreed with this, no matter how offended he would have been.

Joe Randazzo of the Onion said it well:

This will be framed by many as the latest salvo in an ongoing war between the West and Islam, when what this really amounts to is the slaughter of innocent people. These murderers don’t represent anyone but themselves, their own twisted view of reality. They don’t stand for an entire religion anymore than the Westboro Baptist Church stands for an entire religion or the Ku Klux Klan stands for an entire race.”

As activists, we are in a unique time. We live in an extremely bipolar society. It does a 180 in just a matter of hours on every issues. One day, Foix Gras is banned in California, the next a judge changes it back. One day, some guys write a silly cartoon, the next 12 people die for holding pencils from guys who want to police free speech and freedom of expression with violence. This has never been seen before in the West but is common place in repressive regimes in other countries where journalists and human rights activists are commonly put in jail, even killed, for far less than what Charlie did. Let’s never forget that.

I defend the rights of Charlie to continue to be funny, obscene (at times) as much as I defend the rights of people like Bill Maher to trash Rush Limbaugh (and vice-versa), or the rights of someone to trash Michael Moore. As Moore explained in his movie “Sicko”, he helped a guy maintaining his website, the biggest anti Michael Moore website on the web, with a check so that the guy could pursue his constitutional right “to trash him into the ground” so he could pay the medical bills for his sick wife. I also defend South Park to also be obscene, funny and gross. I can’t always stomach South Park, but I do stomach Maher and like him (even when he trashes religion, which is not something I always find smart or agree with). No one, I hope, will walk into his show with guns to silence him. Bill Maher has a very good response, for instance, for those who hate Rush Limbaugh: “Don’t listen to him”. That’s the point. I personally can’t stomach Rush Limbaugh, therefore I don’t listen to him. But I would never tell him he doesn’t have the right to his opinions, however distasteful, racists, sexists, I find them.

I gave my business card to the mother of a child I filmed at the march and she saw on the card that I was a vegan. Her reaction was: “This is not about that right?”, she said, offended. I was dealing with lots of emotions and just said “no, it’s not.” She went as far as asking me if I would spread the mini-documentary on “these kinds of Facebook platforms”. So much for free speech and freedom of being a vegan. I wanted to say “well it’s MY freedom of expression and the freedom of animals” but was too emotionally distraught and didn’t want to antagonize on that particular day. Now I regret it.

After a few days, It has never been more important to me to defend free speech because when that right is repressed for anyone in society, it is repressed for all. As activists, we already have a hard time spreading our message but if it weren’t for that free speech we cherish and the chance we have to (so far) live in societies which allow that, how far our message would go?

Joe Randazzo in the Onion, once again, formulated it well:

“Satire must always accompany any free society. It is an absolute necessity. Even in the most repressive medieval kingdoms, they understood the need for the court jester, the one soul allowed to tell the truth through laughter. It is, in many ways, the most powerful form of free speech because it is aimed at those in power, or those whose ideas would spread hate. It is the canary in the coalmine, a cultural thermometer, and it always has to push, push, push the boundaries of society to see how much it’s grown.”

Activists should applaud the ideas of free speech, even the offensive ones because without them, there is no freedom at all. Politically correct thinking is often used by politicians and corporations to repress our rights and manipulate us. Satire (even the less palatable to some), has in the past and will continue to point out the truths that others choose to ignore.

Ross Douthat, of the New York Times (not exactly a satirical newspaper) probably had the best point:

“But we are not in a vacuum. […] because the kind of blasphemy that Charlie Hebdo engaged in had deadly consequences, as everyone knew it could … and that kind of blasphemy is precisely the kind that needs to be defended, because it’s the kind that clearly serves a free society’s greater good. If a large enough group of someones is willing to kill you for saying something, then it’s something that almost certainly needs to be said, because otherwise the violent have veto power over liberal civilization, and when that scenario obtains it isn’t really a liberal civilization any more. Again, liberalism doesn’t depend on everyone offending everyone else all the time, and it’s okay to prefer a society where offense for its own sake is limited rather than pervasive. But when offenses are policed by murder, that’s when we need more of them, not less, because the murderers cannot be allowed for a single moment to think that their strategy can succeed.”

If we’re to succeed as activists of all kinds, we need to keep our society as free speech zones for all (even the ones we disagree with). Because when this freedom disappears, it disappears for all, including and particularly us. When I saw the outpouring of worldwide support, it didn’t remove the pain but it cushioned it. After all, Cabu’s cartoons were around when I was a kid. He used to draw cartoons on a children show I watched as a kid (proving that he was not just outrageous). The others were French institutions in their own rights. We lost very important people because these people were some of the few who dared resists the status quo, the ridiculous (by being more ridiculous than the ridiculous, if you know what I mean), questioning everything, mocking everyone, regardless of political, religious inclinations and, like all good satirists in history, pointed out truth where others didn’t dare go because of their bias for being politically correct, stay in power and maintain conformity.

What this teaches us all is that we have to fight for all to express themselves or none is free to speak.

And let’s not forget the others who died or helped in this tragedy. Several policemen/women died in this tragedy, among them a Muslim and a black. Others saved hostages, like a Muslim man working at the kosher grocery store. At the march, I saw Jews and Muslims holding hands in solidarity because they recognized that these killers in no way represented ANY religious beliefs. But they also recognized that this freedom of speech and expression is what gave them their right to practice their faith. It’s what gives us OUR right to be the voice of the voiceless, to be vegans, to be animal, human and environmental rights activists.

This is a wakeup call to the world and the world responded by saying #IAmCharlie. But certain forces (you saw them heading the Paris march) will make sure that we try to forget this moment of truth by pushing us back into the darkness of ignorance and conformity. In fact, I know for sure that, if Cabu had been watching the march, he would have drawn a cartoon to mock these political opportunists the following day. They are already taking advantage just like they took advantage of 9/11. Some people here are even starting to talk about “False Flag” attacks. Look up the term.

It is up to us all whether this tragedy taught the world a real lesson and to see how far we have grown and how far they will keep us ignorant.

Below various links and cartoons as well as two videos: mine from the march in Montpellier (subtitled in English) in which I interviewed as many people as I could to hear the voice of citizens (not the official media) and one on the New York Times website about the Charlie staff in 2006.

extremistes vegetarien

Cartoon from Bidu: What are cartoonists still able to laugh at?

“I drew a tomato…” “It’s pretty, it’s cool, no risk with a tomato!”

“Mmm I don’t know… Have you thought about the fundamentalist vegetarians?”

My video (subtitled in English) of the Montpellier (Hérault region of France) march with over 100,000 people and various interviews.

Charlie Hebdo is not dead. Guns can’t kill free speech. 3 million copies (compared to the usual 60,000) out because the world demanded it. Article from The Independent.

As of Jan 14, 2015: 5 million copies out in various languages, including Arabic (online only).

More on what is Charlie Hebdo about and its history on Wikipedia

Interesting article of Islam’s hijacking by extremists.

Video on the New York Times website (subtitled in English) of the Charlie Hebdo staff in 2006.

Excellent article from the New York Times: Islam’s Problem With Blasphemy

Update January 16, 2015: Finally someone said the truth on TV. Chris Hedges about Charlie on Breaking the Set

Update Jan 16, 2015: Great article from Chris Hedges about the real problem with North Africans in France, Message from the dispossessed.

Update Jan 16, 2015: Also great interview on Democracy Now! of Tariq Ramadan and Rick McArthur about the bigger picture.

Jeremy Scahill on the Hypocrisy of World Leaders at the Paris march.

I agree with Bill Maher on this: Real Time with Bill Maher: Self Censorship vs. Free Speech (HBO)

B6xQnQYCIAAkcJV

Below: I can’t be manipulated. I support the families of Charlie Hebdo but, however, the emotion doesn’t affect my capacity to think.

961448_766028156812588_1863737782_n

Posted in animal rights, Environment, History, Human Rights, Politics, Religion/Spirituality, Veganism, Women's Rights | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments